Only 3 percent of hospitals meet CMS target for value-based care

Less than a quarter of U.S. hospitals are expected to meet the government’s goal of providing half or more of their patients with value-based care – the initiative designed to replace fee-for-service Medicare reimbursement with healthcare provider payments based on care quality, according to a survey conducted by Health Catalyst. The survey revealed that just 3 percent of health systems today meet the target set by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Moreover, only 23 percent expect to reach the goal by 2019, a year later than CMS expected half of all Medicare reimbursements to be value-based. Fifty-two percent of respondents indicated analytics would be critical to success in a value-based system – more than double the second most-selected answer: a culture of quality improvement. Twenty-four percent of respondents cited cultural alignment on quality as having the most impact on value-based care success. “Transitioning from fee-for-service reimbursement to value-based payments is a goal that many healthcare organizations embrace but are having difficulty implementing as they juggle a number of other high priorities,” Health Catalyst vice president Bobbi Brown said in a statement. “This survey reveals that they’re making progress but they could use a little help – some of it financial and some of it technical in the way of better analytics to help identify at-risk populations and better manage their risk.” The survey shows 62 percent of health systems have zero or less than 10 percent of their care tied to value-based care and payments, and those numbers include accountable care organizations. Small hospitals with fewer than 200 beds make up the majority of those lagging on...